Vi turister/utlänningar blir mer och mer impopulära i Goa

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Blev medlem: 2011-04-18

Under den senaste tiden har det skrivits mycket om hur indier upplever oss turister i Goa.
Idag finns denna artikel på Navhind Times hemsida:

Goans turning away from beaches
NT Team

PANAJI — An increasing number of Goans, who had enjoyed a visit to the beaches in the past, are beginning to feel alienated from the beaches because of the overwhelming presence of tourists and tourist-related businesses and the resulting chaos in the seashore environment.

For ages, Goans have enjoyed the serene beauty of the beaches while they came for relaxation any time of the year or to take sea bath during the summer season, but the inflow of large number of tourists over the years from different parts of the country as well as abroad has changed the scenario on the Goan beaches with locals now having to struggle to find places.

With Goa gaining fame as a beach tourist destination over past two to three decades, Goan entrepreneurs who took to tourism-related businesses have changed the scene on the beaches, with a large number of beach shacks, beds and umbrellas being put up resulting in scarce place for native Goans who enjoyed beaches freely before.

A resident of Marcela, Mr Pandurang Tilve, who had come for annual bathing at the Miramar beach, said that the scenario has changed from what it was during the olden times. He attributed this change to an increase in population, which has increased by over three times than it was during liberation time, and boom in tourism. He pointed out that Miramar beach was still better because there were no beach beds and shacks causing hindrance to the movement of the people.

However, Mr Shaikh Abdul Latif from Ribandar, who has also come for bathing along with his family, said that even Miramar has not remained the same as it was some years back. He said that tourists are nuisance who have spoilt the beaches.

Many felt that the scenario on beaches in the state is turning grimmer and making it difficult to move about, sit and enjoy a bath or relaxation.

Shacks, beach beds, umbrellas, water sports and allied activities at Calangute, often referred to as the queen of beaches in Goa and now a prime beach destination for tourists, has prompted many Goans to look out for quieter destinations, which are hard to find.

“We have been frequently coming to Calangute for more than two decades for bathing but over the past 10 years or so we find that the beach has been congested and one can hardly move about freely,” said Mr Mahadev Naik (name changed) from Bicholim. The place has not only changed but has also lost its charm, he added.

Likewise, many other places in North Goa and South Goa have also undergone transformation over the years; even lesser frequented beaches becoming overcrowded in far-off places like Arambol, Morjim, which have almost lost their local rootings and touch.

People in South Goa continue to have a strong sense of belonging to the beaches but feel that dirty, overcrowded beaches and presence of water sports and other obstructions are gradually turning them away from beaches.

Adress till Navhind Times artikel: http://www.navhindtimes.com/articles.php?Story_ID=051611" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;" onclick="window.open(this.href);return false;

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Blev medlem: 2011-04-18

För att balansera tråden kommer här en artikel från The Herald där ett engelskt par väljer att åka hem till Storbritannien efter många år i Goa. Detta p.g.a allt negativt som sker när det gäller verksamheter som drivs av utlänningar:

13 May,2008
Goodbye Goa; it’s a shame it had to end this way
Martin and Sue Smith, UK

My wife and I started a small business in Goa about 12 years ago. In those days, everyone we spoke to (Western and Goan) could not believe that we wanted to leave the comfort of the UK and start afresh in Goa. At the time, we thought we would be here for the rest of our lives. Sadly we are leaving for the last time at the end of May.
During our time here we have seen many changes; some good, some bad, some hard to understand. Our business was a small hotel with a restaurant and bar. We had some money invested abroad, so being overly prosperous was not essential for us to survive. As a result, both our accommodation and restaurant prices were modest.
We paid our taxes in full (much to the dismay of our accountant), kept all of our obligatory paperwork up-to-date, and tried to get on with the local residents. Over time, we became prosperous owing to repeat customers, both in dining and accommodation. As result, we feel that we have had a positive impact on both local and state prosperity.
But over the last 18 months, the ‘Foreigner go home’ campaign waged in the media and by local politicians has grown from something that was mildly amusing in the early days to a monster of epic proportions.
This season, all the powers-that-be seem to have been hell-bent on destroying the Goa tourist industry. The late issuing of shack licences, the ban on music even when there are no complaints from people living nearby, the difficulty in obtaining visas, the forcible removal of sunbeds while tourists are laying on them, the dumping of refuse in the streets and on the beaches, a higher number of deaths in the sea than ever before, accusing all tourists of being drug users/dealers or, amazingly, importers, calling regular visitors to Goa the “dregs of the tourism industry”, taxi drivers trying to increase their fares to a minimum of Rs700, even for a trip of a kilometre or less...
Just when things were looking as if they could not get any worse, in mid February, a minor girl was drugged, molested and murdered. Since then, the ‘Scarlet effect’ has intensified the efforts of everyone determined to see the end of tourists in Goa. Because the girl’s mother would not be gagged, the whole venom of both Goan society and Goan politicians in particular has been vented on all foreigners; not only the tourist but even the businessman.
The Foreigners Registration Office has even asked my wife and I why we do not charge more for our rooms: “Is it because you get money from drugs?” This, even after 10 years of being a law abiding resident of Goa!
The final reason that we are leaving is that for the last eight years, we have been 50 per cent occupied by advance bookings for next season, which we get by the end of present season. About 40 per cent of bookings were then taken during the monsoon, with about 10 per cent being filled by ‘walk ins’ during the season. This year, we had less than 5 per cent pre-booked!
We are therefore getting out before next season turns into a major disaster. Fortunately, our hotel was purchased in our company’s name and we have been able to sell the whole business to a couple from Delhi, unlike some foreigners who put their business property in their personal names and now cannot sell.
We would like to say farewell to all the friends and acquaintances we have in India and Goa in particular. To all those who want the foreigners out, we hope you are happy with the reduction in tourism next season. Unfortunately, it will not be the politicians who go hungry next season, it will be all the businessmen and women who depend on the tourist industry. It should be interesting to see Delhi’s approach to this situation when foreign exchange inflow drops so drastically in the next 12 months. But whatever it is, it will be too little too late.

Länk till artikeln: http://oheraldo.in/pagedetails.asp?nid=3899&cid=14

MH
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Blev medlem: 2007-05-01

ja , kanske är Kerala ett bättre alternativ eller varför inte Thailand.
Jag tyckte själv under min sista resa i Goa att det hade försämrats mycket bara på ett år .
Mera buisness , mera droger, mera nedskräpning.
Men jag tycker att det är synd att lokalbefolkningen lägger skulden på turisterna , när det är lokalbefolkningen som handlar mest med droger och står för större delen av nedskräpning.
Bojkotta Goa !!!!

Kitty
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Blev medlem: 2011-09-15

David, du kan väl berätta vad det är för skillnad på Goa och Kerala. Vi har ju bara varit i Norra Goa och har alltså bara sett den biten.
Vi funderar på att ev ta ett par dagar i ngn strand hydda i Södra Goa nästa resa (som går till Calangute) för att få se lite hur det är där.
//Kitty

MH
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Blev medlem: 2007-05-01

ja , jag är också intreserad av att höra om hur det är i Kerala.
skriv gärna om hur ni har upplevt skillnaden mellan kerala och Goa

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Blev medlem: 2011-04-18

Jämförelse mellan Goa / Kerala är klart intressant så jag har skapat en särskild tråd om detta.
Annars är risken att det vi diskuterar här övergår i något helt annat.

Här är den nya tråden: http://www.indien.nu/forum/viewtopic.php?f=19&t=8906

melliot
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Blev medlem: 2011-05-30

Fick höra av mina Indiska vänner att det fortfarande finns orörda jätte vackra stränder i Karnataka.........så dit ska jag ta mig i vinter.

Melliot

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Blev medlem: 2011-04-16

MH skrev:
Men jag tycker att det är synd att lokalbefolkningen lägger skulden på turisterna , när det är lokalbefolkningen som handlar mest med droger och står för större delen av nedskräpning.
Bojkotta Goa !!!!

Var har du fått tag på den statistiken ?

echo
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Blev medlem: 2011-09-13

Ytterligare en artikel i ämnet från Daily Telegraph i Västbengalen, http://www.pressdisplay.com/pressdisplay/showlink.aspx?bookmarkid=Q84SWX7KX6C7 Foreigners Go Home

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Blev medlem: 2011-04-18

Det går nästan inte en enda dag utan att det står något om detta i dom indiska och brittiska tidningarna.
Känns allt annat än bra och senaste året har det varit mycket negativt kring Goa. Inte bra för de som har
satsat mycket eller kanske allt dom har på just turistnäringen.....